Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Personal tools

Sections
HomeNewsGreen light for Erasmus+

Green light for Erasmus+

The Liechtenstein government’s approval of the country’s participation in the fourth generation of European educational programmes, Erasmus+, reflects the success the project has enjoyed to date. The positive response from the government also ensures that European educational programmes will continue to be offered at the University of Liechtenstein.

The Liechtenstein government’s approval of the country’s participation in the fourth generation of European educational programmes, Erasmus+, reflects the success the project has enjoyed to date. The positive response from the government also ensures that European educational programmes will continue to be offered at the University of Liechtenstein.

The 4th generation of European educational programmes, Erasmus+, follows on from the 3rd generation (comprising Lifelong Learning and Youth in Action), which comes to an end at the close of this year. In the coming years from 2014 to 2020, Erasmus+ opens up new prospects of increased mobility for students and European and international educational partnerships. Use of these networks will also help to promote Liechtenstein as an educational and economic centre. 

This means that the University of Liechtenstein will continue to host these projects, which have been excellently organised and carried out hitherto. Apart from increased mobility for students and teachers, these also include intensive courses and vocational education projects under the auspices of the Leonardo da Vinci scheme. Just with a view to boosting the mobility of students, teachers and employees, the University of Liechtenstein received subsidies amounting to around 750,000 euros in the years from 2007 to 2013. 



Clemens Gieselbrecht with fellow students in Istanbul, Turkey


A retrospective view

Liechtenstein took part for the first time in the EU’s vocational training programme COMETT in the year 1991. This was followed by membership of the EU vocational training programmes SOCRATES and LEONARDO DA VINCI from 1995 on. Under this scheme the university was able for the first time to send two architecture students for a period of study at a partner university in the academic year 1996/97. Subsequent years saw significant activities in the field of internationalisation, landmarks of which were the introduction of the ECTS system, submission of intensive ERASMUS programmes involving partnerships at European university level, the intake of guest students, development of programmes of practical study and implementation of the fundamental principles of the Bologna Process.   

The university’s participation in the EU’s Lifelong Learning programme since 2007, backed up by activities to promote the mobility of teaching and administrative staff in recent years, has contributed powerful impulses towards the further intensification of involvement in international educational schemes.



Structure made of reinforced steel, from the Erasmus intensive project on architecture


Worldwide networking

For the University of Liechtenstein, Erasmus sometimes functions as the driving force of internationalisation. It was as a result of Erasmus that English study courses, the student hall of residence and the ECTS credit system have become established features of the university. Starting from isolated study modules in English, the university now offers entire courses in the English language. The positive experience resulting from exchanges within Europe could soon be extended to include exchanges with countries in other parts of the globe. 

Today the University of Liechtenstein enjoys partnerships with institutes of higher education all over the world. Around 50 students, teachers and employees of the university benefit from the prospects of mobility offered by Erasmus every year.



Isabell Davies-Falch (left) on a staff mobility placement in Warsaw, Poland