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HomeNewsJoseph Binder Award in Gold goes to Alberto Alessi

Joseph Binder Award in Gold goes to Alberto Alessi

Alberto Alessi, a lecturer at the Institute for Architecture and Spatial Development, and Atelier Gassner-Redolfi [the Gassner-Redolfi Studio] have together won the Joseph Binder International Award in Gold for their exhibition Holzperspektiven [Wood Perspectives] at the Rubner Centre in Kiens.


Alberto Alessi, a lecturer at the Institute for Architecture and Spatial Development, and Atelier Gassner-Redolfi [the Gassner-Redolfi Studio] have together won the Joseph Binder International Award in Gold for their exhibition Holzperspektiven [Wood Perspectives] at the Rubner Centre in Kiens.


The Joseph Binder Award of designaustria – Austria’s only international competition for graphic design and illustration – was being held for the twelfth time. The competition was a signal success. 
340 participants from 28 different countries, with a total of 690 submissions, were contending to win one of the coveted trophies. Big names with an established international reputation had a chance to demonstrate their talents, along with numerous younger establishments. Gassner Redolfi, one of the most prominent studios in Austria’s Vorarlberg region, and Alberto Alessi Architecture together convinced the judges with their conception and design of the permanent exhibition Holzperspektiven for the Rubner Centre. The exhibition pays tribute to wood as a sustainable building material, showing it in multiple perspectives.


The exhibition of the 79 winning projects is on show until 23 November 2014 at designforum in Vienna.





About the project

At the Rubner Centre in Kiens, South Tyrol, you can experience the passion for wood in the most direct way – by feeling wood, smelling wood, seeing and understanding it. The exhibition Holzperspektiven opened in 2014, and it presents wood as a building material of the 21st century in 360° vision, as an experience for all the senses. It tells a story about forests, trees and buildings, makes the physical and haptic properties of wood a matter of direct experience and shows its importance for building culture – both in earlier times and today, on both regional and international level.